SOME GIVE THEIR LIVES TO PROTECT AFRICA’S WILDLIFE

Africa Hope Fund helps supports people who put their lives at risk to protect Africa’s wildlife, especially elephants whose numbers are still perilously low. Your contributions go directly to organizations like Conservation South Luangwa (http://cslzambia.org/) where Rachel McCobb and the scouts in her organization risk their lives when they investigate poaching activity in the Zambian bush.

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John Gardiner
DAD’S WATCHING

This little cub has a mother, father, and older brother. Africa Hope Fund helps support the Zambia Carnivore Program which tracks carnivores in three locations in Zambia. The knowledge they gain from radio-tracking collars, months spent in the bush, and air patrols from the plane they share with Conservation South Luangwa helps protect all carnivores in the South Luangwa Valley.

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John Gardiner
WE NEVER GET TIRED OF HIPPOS

We never seem to get tired of snapping photos of hippos, even though they are dangerous and tend to be cranky. This is actually a bird photo because the bird on the hippo’s head is one of my favorites. It’s a hammerkop stork. He always looks like he’s being blown by the wind and it’s messing up his hair.

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John Gardiner
VIEW THE SUNSETS OF A LIFETIME

Africa Hope Fund Board members Leslie Leggio and Steve Kuhn want you to see the spectacular Zambian sunsets along the South Luangwa River. You’ll hate to leave when you’ve been served delicious appetizers and the beverage of your choice while watching the sun set.

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Carol Van Brugen
HELPING OUR FRIENDS IN THE NORTH

Craig Zytkow, CEO of Conservation Lake Tanganyika made it his life’s work to protect the remaining 32 elephants in Lake Kasaba, all that are left from the region’s past abundance. Over the years, poaching to support Asia’s demand for ivory reduced the elephant herd to only 32 elephants.

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Carol Van Brugen
MORE A PARADE OF ELEPHANTS

Our guide said he’d never seen this before. A parade of 40-50 elephants walking two to three abreast in a long line. Males and females, calves and babies, aunts, cousins, including magnficient mature elephants with huge tusks.

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Carol Van Brugen
JOBS IN MFUWE

People who come to Mfuwe and can’t find jobs often try to live by farming a few acres of cotton, peanuts (ground nuts), corn (maize), and tobacco. But they depend on rain, and have little access to fertilizer or others soil amendments. They also risk losing their crops to raiding elephants. People who subsistence farming must raise enough to feed their families and trade for other products like clothing and cooking oil.

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Carol Van Brugen
HOW ARE ZAMBIAN STUDENTS DIFFERENT FROM U.S KIDS?

At home, our students don’t usually enter reading contests like this. Take a look at this little guy in a reading competition with eight other schools in the area, a first for Uyoba School. Just a year earlier, Africa Hope Fund provided a new reading program with books for each student. Their test scores jumped that year.

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Carol Van Brugen
HOW TO HIDE AN ELEPHANT

It doesn’t seem possible that a thirteen foot tall mammal weighing more than 15,000 pounds can sneak up on a person. But look how this elephant’s color blends in with branches and woods. And how this herd coming through the woods and preparing to cross the South Luangwa River blends in so well, it’s nearly impossible to count them.

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Carol Van Brugen
ELEPHANTS AND PEANUTS

Yesterday I bought some salted peanuts in the shell. Today while I was waiting for water t boil for my tea, I grabbed a couple of peanuts, and a memory flashed past. I was very small and probably at a zoo, and feeding a solitary elephant a peanut as she reached her trunk over the metal fence

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Carol Van Brugen
ELEPHANTS - A NATURAL SIGHT

Taken towards the end of the day, this photo of   a lagoon in the South Luangwa National Park is the very essence of the life elephants should lead. During the wet season, the lagoon is full of water, fish, and birds are abundant, herbivores like puku and impala are plentiful, and the elephants enjoy the luxury of spraying themselves with water.

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Carol Van Brugen
WE CAN DO THIS

Before I traveled to Zambia in 2011, I had no idea how close elephants are to extinction. I never thought about how many elephants died so their tusks could become ornaments and trophies. I didn’t understand that they have been hunted for their ivory for centuries.

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Carol Van Brugen
WHY ZAMBIA?

People ask Carol Van Bruggen and me, “Why Zambia? Why not do good work at home?" Our answer is that we do both and so do our board members/directors. Sharing our abundance with others doesn’t have borders.

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Carol Van Brugen
THE HISTORY OF IVORY

The word elephant comes from the Greek language for ivory. Elephants were hunted for their ivory before Egyptian King Tutankhamun, in power during the middle of the 12th century, was buried in a casket with 45,000 pieces of inlaid ivory. 

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Carol Van Brugen
THE SOUTH LUANGWA NATIONAL PARK

The South Luangwa National Park is nearly two and a half million acres of grasslands, riverine and riparian woodlands, rivers, lagoons, and semi-aquatic grasslands surrounded by bush in a country of one hundred and forty-eight million acres with mopane, mahogany, leadwood, winterthorn, sausage trees, vegetable ivory palms, marula, tamarind trees, and more.

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Carol Van Brugen
MFUWE VILLAGE – PART II

Mfuwe has a police department and a local clinic which is usually staffed by doctors who come for short periods and are hired by the safari industry. There is one gasoline station and one occasionally working ATM machine where a small herd of goats seems to like hanging around.

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Carol Van Brugen